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Vincent Price in Six Gothic Tales (House of Usher / The Pit and The Pendulum / Tales of Terror / The Raven / The Haunted Palace / The Tomb of Ligeia) 
Written by: on January 15th, 2015


Theatrical Release Date: USA, 1960 – 1963, UK, 1964
Director: Roger Corman
Writers: Richard Matheson, Charles Beaumont, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert Towne
Cast: Vincent Price, Mark Damon, Myrna Fahey, Harry Ellerbe, John Kerr, Barbara Steele, Luana Anders, Maggie Pierce, Leona Gage, Peter Lorre, Joyce Jameson, Basil Rathbone, Debra Paget, Boris Karloff, Hazel Court, Olive Sturgess, Jack Nicholson, Lon Chaney Jr., Elisha Cook Jr., Elizabeth Shepherd, John Westbrook, Derek Francis, Oliver Johnston, Richard Vernon, Frank Thornton

BluRay released: December 8th, 2014
Approximate running times: 79 minutes (House of Usher), 81 minutes (The Pit and the Pendulum), 89 minutes (Tales of Terror), 86 minutes (The Raven), 87 minutes (The Tomb of Ligeia), 82 minutes (The Tomb of Ligeia)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC (All Films)
Rating: 12 (The Tomb of Ligeia) 15 (House of Usher / The Pit and the Pendulum / Tales of Terror / The Haunted Palace), PG (The Raven)
Sound: LPCM Mono English (All Films)
Subtitles: English SDH (All Films)
BluRay Release: Arrow Video
Region Coding: Region B (All Films)
Retail Price: £69.99 (UK)


Roger Cormen directed eight films in his Edgar Allan Poe film cycle and this collection contains six of those eight films, with the two missing films being, Premature Burial and The Masque of the Red Death. Frequent collaborators on these films include cinematographer Floyd Crosby (who worked on the first six films in the cycle), screenwriters Richard Matheson (who worked on a total of four films in the cycle) and Charles Beaumont (who worked on a total of three films in the cycle) and composer Lex Baxter (who worked on a total of four films in the cycle).

House of Usher: The last remaining male descendant of a cursed family refuses to let his sister marry that man she loves because he believes that the only way to end his families curse is by ending their blood line.

When Roger Corman embarked on series of films based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. He was primarily known for directing about rebellious teenagers and schlocky B movie monster films. With the most notably of these pre Poe films being Little Shop of Horrors.

Besides the increased budgets, the other area that stands out head and shoulders about Corman’s films starting with House of Usher and beyond is his marked improvement as a filmmaker. And I am not talking baby steps or a slight transformation. Virtually overnight (literally over the course of one film) he formulates a distinctive visual style that he would become synonymous with him from here on out.

Though he was not first and most definitely would not be the last filmmaker to venture into the Gothic horror film genre. It is interesting to compare the striking similarities in Poe films with the Gothic horror films that Italian filmmaker Mario Bava was making around the same time half way around the world. It should be noted that even though AIP released many Bava films. They would not release their first Bava film until about one year after House of usher had made its theatrical debut.

In true Corman fashion with House of Usher, he takes a story that requires the bare minimum actors and takes place in primarily in one main location. And the end result of a film that far exceeds and feels much grander than the sum of its parts.

Visually there is never a shortage of atmosphere. In fact there is so much atmosphere on display here that is could fill multiple films. Also though these are Poe adaptations, there is no need to worry about being familiar with his literary legacy or have a familiarity with the story at hand to fully enjoy what Corman is putting forth on the screen.

Being that this film a rather intimate affair it should not be too surprising how much of a role the performances of this film’s three main actors play in the success of this film. First and foremost to be acknowledge is the performance of Vincent Price (The Witchfinder General) in the role of Roderick Usher the last living male descendant of a cursed family. He gives a utterly convincing performance of a man who has long since lost grip with reality. The other two main cast members include Myrna Fahey in the role of Madeline Usher and Mark Damon (Naked You Die) in the role of Madeline Usher’s suitor.

The most telling fact about Roger Corman’s House of Usher is how well it holds up to the film’s which will follow it in his cycle of Poe themed. It was after all his first foray into the world of Poe and yet the end result easily ranks high when compared the films which make Corman’s Poe film cycle. And in this humble reviewers opinion there is actually only one film that I would rank higher then House of Usher and that film would be The Masque of the Red Death.

The Pit and the Pendulum: A young man visits his brother in laws home after learning that his sister died under mysterious circumstances.

Sequels are a necessary evil of the film industry and though The Pit and the Pendulum is not a continuation of House of Usher plot wise. It is a continuation of a series of films directed by Roger Corman that were all based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Thus making it an unofficial sequel of the aforementioned House of Usher. And one would think that following the success of House of Usher that Roger Corman would have been given more freedom and a larger budget to work with. Unfortunately that would not be the case as he was working with AIP (American International Pictures) a company known for being notoriously cheap when it came to their budgets. Fortunately this lack of resources was something that Corman was used too and as he progressed as a filmmaker he would excel with less where most filmmakers would falter.

After choosing which story that he wanted to adapt next the first issue that Corman had to deal with was what he going to do about the first two acts since the story he choose was only long enough to carry the film’s final act. And this is where screenwriter Richard Matheson’s invaluable contribution not only to this film but to the whole cycle of Poe films shines the brightest as he weaves elements in the first two acts that are drawn from the works of Edgar Allan Poe. He creates a strong narrative that helps build and sustain the mounting sense of doom present throughout this film.

Visually Corman with The Pit and the Pendulum once again surprises as this film is another giant step in regards to his development as a director. The Gothic atmosphere that is prevalent throughout House of Usher is covered over for this film and this time around he further exploits the use of colors to further add dimensions to the story at hand. A few of this films standout moments visually include the blue tinted flashbacks and of course this film’s finale.

Performance wise, Vincent Price (Theatre of Blood) is once again cast in the main roles. He portrays Nicholas Medina the husband who with died under mysterious circumstances in an iron maiden. Price is very good in this film as he is given the task of playing a grieving widower who’s wife’s ghost has come back to haunt me and drive him mad. Cast in the role of Price’s wife is Barbara Steele (Black Sunday, Silent Scream) and though her screen time is limited to flashbacks and the films final act. Her specter of her characters plays a pivotal role in this film’s narrative. Unfortunately outside of Price and Steele the rest of the cast are at best adequate. Overall though there is a lot to enjoy and like about The Pit and the Pendulum, it still is over shadow by what came before it House of Usher.

Tales of Terror stands out from the rest of Corman’s Poe adaptions as the one and only time he made an anthology film from the collected works of Edgar Allan Poe. And when compared to his seven other Poe films which all stretch its source to fit the rigid confines of a feature length film. In regards to presenting the fiction of Poe in an analogy format verse as a feature film for each story. This proves to be better suited way to transcribe the Poe fiction and it is surprising that Corman would not return to the anthology format before leaving world of Poe behind.

Morella: A young woman tries to reconnect with her estranged father, who had her sent away shortly after her birth. With the source of his animosity towards his daughter linked to her mother’s death, while giving birth to her. Will he ever be able to let go of his anger or will it finally lead to his demise?

The Black Cat: An alcoholic husband discovers that his wife is having an affair with a wine coinsure. So the husband concocts a devious plan to rid himself of his cheating wife and her lover. Unfortunately for him a pesky black cat inadvertently threatens to unravel his devious plan.

The Case of M. Valdemar: Not wanting his last moments to be overwhelmed by pain, a man named Valdemar enlists the help of a hypnotist who assists him in reducing his pain through hypnotism. And in return for doing this Valdemar has agreed to let the hypnotists that right to hypnotize him at the moment he is about to pass and thus keep him in a state of limbo. Will the hypnotist keep his end of the bargain or does he have grander plans in regards to what he wants from Valdemar?

Visually all three stories look great and have a tremendous amount of atmosphere. Set designs is also top notch as Corman continues to recycle sets from previous Poe films and has a firmer grasp of what he is trying to achieve artistically. And as mentioned before the anthology format works very well with Poe’s fiction and pacing wise there is never an issue as stories are no longer pushed beyond their potency.

When it comes to tanking these three tales. If I had to choose one as my favorite that one would be the first tale ‘Morella’ which offers a different side of Price then what is seen in the other Poe adaptions and another one of its strengths is its intimacy. These scenes between Price and Maggie Pierce are easily the one that leave the strongest lasting impression.

Not far behind ‘Morella’, is the second tale ‘The Black Cat’, which also happens to be one of Poe’s most adapted stories. And though this one takes a brief moment before it finds its footing. Its iconic ending and Peter Lorre’s (M, Mad Love) sublime performance.

The third and final tale ‘The Case of M. Valdemar’ is by default the weakest of the three. And though the performances are entertaining. The end result is a methodical exercise in crafting terror that is devoid of the engaging characters that populate the other two stories.

The Raven: A magician named Bedlo has been turned into a Raven. So he enlists the help of a former sorcerer named Craven to bring him back to his human form. Shortly thereafter Craven is lured into a duel to the death by an unscrupulous sorcerer named Scarabus.

By the time that Roger Corman got to The Raven, his fifth foray into the world of Edgar Allan Poe. He had already recycled many times over the things that original inspired him to adapt Poe in the first place. Fortunately Corman was never a filmmaker who rested on his laurels and to renew his interest in the Poe series he would give it a slight makeover. Where the previous Poe films relied heavily on atmosphere, this latest adaptation would put a humorous spin on subject matter that originated in the realm of the macabre. For many who had become fond of the previous Poe films, this tongue and cheek approach to the subject matter at hand was a bitter pill. And it should not come as surprise that this film that continues to be the most divisive out of Corman’s eight Poe films.

Narrative wise, outside of the film’s opening sequence where the character named Bedlo arrives at Craven’s home in the form of a Raven. This is essentially the extent of Poe’s influence on the film and pretty much all that follows this opening sequence is an entity unto its own. And though there have been countless other films that have also featured magicians / sorcerers. The magic performed in this film requires a much larger leap of faith, then one would expect considering similar themed subject matter. With that being said, this added level of absurdity lends itself effortlessly to the humor that runs deep throughout this film. In fact one could easily argue that the reason why said humor works as well as it does is because how outlandish some of the things that are which occur in this film.

Though all the Poe films, including this film all feature first rate visuals. It is the performances in this film that are ultimately going to sell you on this film. And once again Vincent Price is featured in a prominent role and this time around he portrays a retired sorcerer named Craven. With the other two prominent roles being Peter Lorre (M, Mad Love) in the role Bedlo and Boris Karloff (Black Sabbath) in the role of Scarabus, the arch nemesis of Craven. And of these three performances Peter Lorre steals the show as he delivers a delirious performance that features the funniest lines of dialog. Also the scenes he has with Jack Nicholson (Chinatown) in the role of Bedlo’s son, is without a doubt the most entertaining as they have a tremendous amount of chemistry. With Price and Karloff’s moment to shine come in the form of a sorcerers duel to the death, which occurs near the end of the film.

The Haunted Palace: Charles Dexter Ward returns to the cursed village of Arkham, where one hundred years before his ancestor died at the hands of mob that branded him a warlock.

Reportedly The Haunted Palace began as a H.P. Lovecraft adaptation and it was not until very late into the production that Corman realized that AIP (American International Pictures) were going to brand the film a Poe film. And though this film has long had its admires, it is a shame that it was not released as a H.P. Lovecraft film that could have perhaps started a new cycle of films from Corman.

Though Poe and Lovecraft have long been linked due to the bulk of their output being tales rooted in the macabre. Prose wise they are like night and day, with Lovecraft’s work being more cerebral of the too. Also were the majority of the horrors depicted in Poe’s literature are visually crystal clear, the same cannot be said for Lovecraft who often creates entities that mere words cannot describe.

The thing that immediately grabs you while watching The Haunted Palace for the first time is the look of the film. Not wanting to simply recycle what he had already done before with the Poe films, Corman creates a visual tapestry has a deliberately different look then the Poe films.

Narrative wise, ‘The Case of Charles Dexter Ward’ serves as the shell for this Lovecraft adaption. Which content wise is actually more of a melting pot of Lovecraft’s literary works, then one singular story being adapted into a film. And just like the Poe films with this film, Corman wisely chooses to take bits and pieces from various stories instead of trying to do a straight forward adaption.

Returning once again in the role of the protagonist is Vincent Price and this time around he gets to opportunity to play a dual role of Joseph Curwen and Charles Dexter Ward. Price gives a solid performance that is head and shoulders above the rest of the performances in this film. Besides Price it should be noted that several other actors have dual roles in this film. Another performance of note is Lon Chaney Jr. (The Wolf Man) in the role of Simon Orne, the man in charge of getting Ward’s family estate reading for his arrival.

When this film was released in 1963 there were no other Lovecraft adaptions to compare it too. Since then the tide has turned and in recent years there has been an influx of films adapted from or inspired by the literary works of H. P. Lovecraft. Unfortunately despite this influx, the end results far too often fail to capture the essence of what makes Lovecraft’s stories so enthralling. With that being said, The Haunted Palace remains one of the strongest Lovecraft adaptions and it is a pity that Corman would never return to Lovecraft’s universe.

The Tomb of Ligeia: A man’s obsession with his deceased wife threatens to put his new found love in jeopardy. Will he be able to put his deceased wife to rest once and for all or he lose grip of his sanity in the process?

All good things must eventually come to an end. After completing The Masque of the Red Death, which is arguably Corman’s strongest film in his Poe cycle. He would venture one last time into the world of Poe with The Tomb of Ligeia, what is widely considering the most maligned film from Corman’s Poe cycle.

And though The Tomb of Ligeia has carried over many of the ingredients from the previous Poe films. The end result is something that stands apart from the rest of the films, with the most notable difference being the tone of the film which this time around adds a romance angle to the Gothic vibe that is present throughout the Poe cycle. Another area where this film drastically differs from its predecessors is its extensive use of live locations over sound stages.

With that being said, since the beginning of the Poe cycle Corman was always looking for news way to be creative and trying his best not to repeat himself too much. And this shifting to more natural locations gives the film a much more foreboding vibe, then the use of sound-stage which often rooted the horror in the realm of nightmares, albeit ones filled with a tremendous amount of atmosphere.

Visually as whole though this film is not as striking as the other films in the Poe Cycle. And yet it features one of the jaw dropping moments to appear in any of the Poe’s. The scene in question is a dream sequence where The Lady Rowena Trevanion receives a bouquet of flowers with a dead fox in the middle the arrangement and said sequence sends with her in the arms of Verden Fell, passionately kissing. And though this is the more grounded of Corman’s Poe’s films, this sequence shows his knack for capturing what lays beyond on the surface and in the realm of one’s psyche.

When discussing The Tomb of Ligeia, so much of its criticism comes from the casting of Vincent Price in the role of the film’s protagonist Verden Fell. And reportedly the screenplay was written with a much younger actor in mind then Price, who was at the time twenty five years older than his leading lady Elizabeth Shepherd.

Fortunately for those who have seen Price in other roles known of his vast range as an actor and after the initial shock of seeing him for the first time, his exterior look from then on never proves to be intrusive. And though this is another solid performance from Price. The real star of this film is Elizabeth Shepherd in the dual roles of The Lady Rowena Trevanion and The Lady Ligeia. Another thing that ensures that this film remains engaging throughout is Price and Shepherd’s undeniable onscreen chemistry.

The BluRay:

There are six films that are included as part of Vincent Price in Six Gothic Tales, each film comes on a separate 50 GB dual layer BluRay and is presented in a 1080 progressive widescreen. Colors and flesh tones look accurate, details look crisp and there are no issues with DNR or compression. Overall the sources used for these six films transfers is in great shape and it is easily the best they ever looked on home video.

There are two audio provided for all of the films included with this box set, a LPCM mono mix English and the second audio track is a music and effects track. The LPCM mono for all six films is in very good shape as dialog is always clear, everything sounds balanced and robust when it needs too. Also included with this release is removable English SDH subtitles.

Extras for House of Usher include a trailer for the film (2 minutes 30 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), a eleven minute audio essay about the film, a playful interview with actor Vincent Price from 1986 (11 minutes 26 seconds – 1080 Progressive 1.33:1 aspect ratio), interviews with author Jonathan Rigby (32 minutes 58 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and filmmaker Joe Dante (26 minutes 47 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and a informative audio commentary with director Roger Corman.

Topics discussed in the interview with Joe Dante include his first near encounter with Roger Corman and how many years later he became a trailer editor and eventually as a feature film director for Corman, establishing a style as a director, Roger Corman’s Edgar Allan Poe series and composer Les Baxter. Topics discussed in the interview with Jonathan Rigby include the film House of Usher, Roger Corman and other film adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe.

Extras for The Pit and the Pendulum include a trailer for the film (2 minutes 30 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), an additional scene shot for television (5 minutes 4 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), An Evening of Edgar Allan Poe with Vincent Price (53 minutes 7 seconds – 1080 Progressive 1.33:1 aspect ratio, with optional English SDH subtitles) Price reads a selection of Poe’s classic stories before a live audience, including The Tell-Tale Heart, The Sphinx, The Cask of Amontillado and The Pit and the Pendulum, a documentary titled ‘Behind the Swinging Blade’ (43 minutes 7 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) that includes comments from director Roger Corman, actress Barbara Steele, Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price, filmmaker Brian Yunza and two audio commentaries, the first one with Roger Corman and the second one with film critic Tim Lucas.

The documentary is well rounded discussion that reveals how this film came about due to the success of House of Usher and how Roger Corman originally intended his second Edgar Allan Poe picture to be Mask of the Red Death, the cast, screenwriter Richard Matheson and his invaluable contributions to the Poe film series, Mario Bava, Hammer Films and various other production related topics.

Topics covered in the audio commentary with Roger Cormen include working on a limited budget, the cast, locations, using of Freudian psychology throughout the film and various other production related topics. This track is ported over from a previous home video release from MGM. The audio commentary with Tim Lucas is an insightful track that is overflowing with info about the film and those involved in making it.

Extras for Tales of Terror include a stills & poster gallery, a trailer for the film (2 minutes 22 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), a featurette with author / film critic Anne Billson titled ‘Cats in Horror Films’ (9minutes 12 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), a short film titled ‘The Black Cat’ directed by Rob Green (18 minutes 21 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), a featurette titled ‘Kim Newman on Edgar Allan Poe’ (29 minutes 33 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and career retrospective documentary for Roger Corman (58 minutes 32 seconds – 1080 Progressive).

The featurette with Anne Billson gives a well-rounded overview of cats and there place in horror cinema. Topics discussed in ‘Kim Newman on Edgar Allan Poe’ include, how Poe’s stories since the early days of cinema have been a staple in the horror genre, bio pictures about Poe’s life, Roger Corman’s Poe films and how AIP continued to make them without Corman, how Poe’s real life often worked its way into his stories, how Poe’s only novel length story ‘The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket’ has yet to be adapted into a film, Poe’s influence on Horror cinema, Spirits of the Dead and Poe’s legacy as an author.

Extras for The Raven include a stills & poster gallery, promotional record (5 minutes 41 seconds), a trailer for the film (2 minutes 27 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), a short film titled ‘The Trick’ about rival magicians directed by Rob Green (12 minutes 19 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), interviews with director Roger Corman (8 minutes 11 seconds – 1080 Progressive) and screenwriter Richard Matheson (6 minutes 45 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and a documentary about actor Peter Lorre titled ‘Peter Lorre: The Double Face’ (61 minutes 21 seconds – 1080 Progressive, in German with English subtitles).

Topics discussed in Roger Corman’s interview include transforming The Raven poem into a full length film and adding comedy tone to the subject matter, how they recycled the sets from previous Poe films, the cast and improvising scenes, how they achieved a few of the special effects and how The Raven is one of his favorite films. Topics discussed in Richard Matheson’s interview include his contributions to the adaption most notably wanting to make the subject matter a comedy, the cast and his thoughts on the works of Edgar Allan Poe. The Peter Lorre documentary is a well-rounded piece that covers his entire career.

Extras for The Haunted Palace include a stills and poster gallery, a trailer for the film (2 minutes 14 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), an interview with director Roger Corman (11 minutes 18 seconds – 1080 Progressive), a featurette titled ‘Kim Newman on H.P. Lovecraft’ (27 minutes 59 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and an audio commentary with Vincent Price s biographer David Del Valle and author Derek Botelho.

Topics discussed in the interview with Roger Corman include, adapting H.P. Lovecraft and how AIP later changed the film into a Poe film, working with screenwriter Charles Beaumont, the look of the film and how it differs from the look of the Poe films, the cast, the film’s score, make-up and special effects work and his thoughts on the final product.

The Featurette with Kim Newman gives a well-rounded overview of the film adaption of H.P. Lovecraft’s literature. He also touches upon how there are numerous instances where elements from Lovecraft’s literature has made uncredited appearances in numerous films over the years. Other areas which are touched upon include how Lovecraft’s disciples have expanded upon his universe and how this has helped keep alive Lovecraft’s literature for future generations. The two most successful film adaptions, Re-Animator and From Beyond.

Topics discussed in the audio commentary with David Del Valle and Derek Botelho include, how The Haunted Palace was the first theatrical film adaption of a H.P. Lovercraft story, how The Haunted Palace is not a faithful adaption of Lovecraft’s ‘The Case of Charles Dexter Ward’ and how other Lovecraft stories were used to help flesh to film’s narrative out, the cast, set design and the look of the film, films Lovecraft adaptions and which ones were the most faithful, problems with the screenplay and David Del Valle throughout the commentary retells many personal recollections that were told to him by Vincent Price.

Extras for The Tomb of Ligeia include a trailer for the film (2 minutes 31 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), four interviews, the first one with composer Kenneth V. Jones (6 minutes 19 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), the second one with clapper loader Bob Jordan (7 minutes 41 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen), the third one with assistant director David Tringham (8 minutes 15 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and the fourth interview with co-screenwriter Paul Mayersberg (24 minutes 25 seconds – 1080 Progressive Widescreen) and two audio commentaries, the first one with director Roger Corman and the second one with actress Elizabeth Shepard.

Topics discussed with composer Kenneth V. Jones include, difficulties that arose while trying compose the score for the film, his thoughts on the film and the score he composed for the film. Topics discussed with clapper loader Bob Jordan include, how he got involved in this film, shooting a film in widescreen, working with Vincent Price, overcoming the limitations of low budget cinema and special effects. Topics discussed with assistant director David Tringham include, how he got involved in this film, working with Roger Corman and adapting to his fast moving style of low budget filmmaking, Vincent Price and special effects. Topics discussed with co-screenwriter Paul Mayersberg include, working with Roger Corman, adapting Ligeia and screenwriter Robert Towne, locations, the look of the film and his thoughts on other films also directed by Corman.

Topics discussed in the audio commentary with Roger Corman include, how The Tomb of Ligeia was his second Poe film that he made in the UK and how the end result various drastically when compared to his previous Poe films, Vincent Price, the look of the film, the cast, how this film had a five week shooting schedule, British film crews verse Hollywood film crews and his thoughts on the films finale. Though there is a lot of interesting information on this track, there are many stretches and moments of dead silence. Topics discussed in the audio commentary with Elizabeth Shepard include, shooting on location, rehearsing scenes, the love story angle and Vincent Price in the role of the romantic leading man, her thoughts on the dual character’s she portrays, Gothic thrillers in color and her thoughts on the films finale. This audio commentary also has many stretches of silence.

Rounding out the extras is a reversible cover art option for each film and a limited edition 200-page collector’s book. Content pertaining to House of Usher includes original archive stills, cast & crew info, an essay titled ‘The House is the Monster’ written by Tim Lucas and information about the transfer. Content pertaining to The Pit and the Pendulum includes, original archive stills, cast & crew info, an essay titled ‘The Waiting Pit of Hell’ written by Jonathan Rigby and information about the transfer. Content pertaining to Tales of Terror includes, original archive stills, cast & crew info, an essay titled ‘Three Down Five To Go’ written by Roger Clarke, information about the transfer, information about the short film The Black Cat and a comic book adaptation for Tales of Terror. Content pertaining to The Raven includes, original archive stills, cast & crew info, an essay titled ‘Comedy and Karloff’ written by Vic Pratt, information about the transfer, information about the short film The Trick and a comic book adaptation for The Raven. Content pertaining to The Haunted Palace includes, original archive stills, cast & crew info, an essay titled ‘Strange Echoes and Fevered Repetitions’ written by Roger Luckhurst and information about the transfer. Content pertaining to The Haunted Palace includes, original archive stills, cast & crew info, an essay titled ‘The Last of the Corman-Poes: Excavating The Tomb of Ligela’ written by Julian Upton, information about the transfer and a comic book adaptation for The Tomb of Ligeia. Other content also included in this 200-page book includes, an excerpt written by Vincent Price from the chapter ‘Ghoul Days’ from the book ‘Vincent Price, His Movies, His Plays, His Life’ and David De Valle’s text based interview with Roger Corman titled ‘Roger Corman: Better to be on the Set Than in the Office’. Overall Vincent Price in Six Gothic Tales is an exceptional release that stands out as one of the best box set releases of 2014, highly recommended.

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